Things I Remember…

Things I Remember…

From Elsa Wahlberg (Now Smith):Vancouver, Washington I enjoyed the pictures of the home sooooo much. They brought back so many memories.  My brother, Jack Wahlberg, sent me your web site..  i remember we had to stand in line before entering the dining room…Boys on the boys side, girls on the girls side, and then we sang ” Onward Christian Soldiers” as we walked into the Dining room…..My brother and I sat at Robert Farrell’s table, and he made us sing the song “USE AJAX, BOOM BOOM, THE FOAMING CLEANSER, WASH THE DIRT , RIGHT DOWN THE DRAIN, BOOM BOOM BOOM BOOM “…..  I got my first (forbidden ) kiss , from Robert Farrell.. I was 13 yrs old……My mother, Svea Wahlberg, worked at the home. She worked in the kitchen, and was a housemother for a while……I remember the trips to Coney Island……..running under the sprinklers in the courtyard, going away to camp every summer, but first picking out our summer clothes that were on these long tables in the  downstairs recreation/locker rooms…..Also, going down the hill every morning to cross over the street to PS 185. There was a rather large man at the bottom of the hill who passed out tissues to all of us…….Up on the 3rd floor, there was the “pink room”, the “blue room”, and the “green” room. These were the bedrooms for different aged girls…..The infirmary was on the 4th floor……What memories…..Lookingback, I realized how lucky we were to be in such a wonderful home…There were so many donations, and we were afforded so much more than a lot of kids who were in “normal ” home situations…We got new outfits for Easter, lots of Christmas parties,  sleep away camp every summer… It was a very unique situation….I’m so glad you have a web site. I’ll stay in touch and contribute more memories as I remember them….. Jack Wahlberg still lives in NYC on 57th Street. One of my daughters and her husband live  on 44th street…I live in Vancouver, Washington, but I visit NYC once in a while………….Elsa Wahlberg Smith. Later on, Elsa wrote that she remembered her Mary Jane – paten leather shoes that all the girls wore.

E-mail-  Elsarrn@msn.com

From Jack Wahlberg:

New York City, NY

I remember Pastor Arell, Pastor Cedarleaf, Al Larson, somebody we called “Gam,” a Mr. Herbert, Joseph Toft who taught me to play Eb Alto Horn, and who was the Band Master at Kallman when I got there, and also the Bandmaster at Central Citadel Salvation Army Corps where I also played.
Camp Memories include Word of Life Island, Camp Whitaker, (also Camp Joy) at Lakeside Bible Conference, and Star Lake (Salvation Army Camp).
Good memories of Mr., Persiko taking us to Riis Park.  Lots of memories about the many events we were privileged to attend such as Steeplechase Park outing, Palisades Amusement Park in Fort Lee, NJ, Roller Skating outings, sponsored by the Police Athletic League, The many Christmas parties for the children of the Home, The annual Bazaars and the selling of tickets to the neighbors in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.  The Band events in Fort Hamilton, Floral Park and the Annual Concert Presentations at the Brooklyn Academy of Music as well as concerts at some churches.  The annual Sunday School parades on one of the Avenues (Fifth or Fourth) in Brooklyn. The Sunday School involvement at Bay Ridge Baptist, Baptist Temple, and ….?
Well, there are a lot more memories that are within but surface from time to time.

Hope you get some of these sites on your Kallman Home Website going.  It would be good to see pictures of fellow “Homies.” Jack also wrote: 

Do you remember the Bazaars that the home had?  I remember selling tickets for the raffles and the various games of chance that were part of the fund raising activity.  Do you remember the Basketball Team?  I think we played for Bay Ridge Baptist Church in the Church League.  Once one begins writing about past memories it seems to open up doors for other memories to surface.Hey, here’s another memory I have:  At Christmas time everyone got Hard Candy as a present.  I remember making “Juice!”  We would put the candy in a jar and add water and then put it on the radiator to “cook.”  Then we would have our jar of juice.  — another —  melting crayons on the radiator into a piece of metal or tin cap. Editors Note:  Yes, I remember the Bazaars very vividly.  I especially remember doing the punch board for prizes.  One year there was a setup of goldfish bowls on several levels.  I threw a ping pong ball several times and missed every time.  But then, I tried it with my eyes closed and would you believe, I won about ten or twelve fish with their bowls.  Needless to say, I had fish to give a way and that was no small task the next day.  I also remember the trips to Bermuda they gave away each year.  Never won that one.

More thoughts from Jack:

Arnie, 
Slowly but surely, as people find out about your good work they will respond and the Website will grow richer with alum’s addresses and contact information.  Thanks for sending on the information from Don Lafayette.
Anecdotes will follow and even though the years have rolled on by, the memories will surface and perhaps friendships will be renewed even if filtered by 50 years of further experiences in life.  Those experiences of childhood were foundational.  We are very fortunate that good people were on the Staff at The Kallman Home for Children.  Their faith formed their character and they passed much of that stability to those of us who were open to their guidance.  Some resisted what was taught but often what was shunned at first hearing became part of the memory from which strength was drawn.
I can second Don’s affirmation that Kallman Home was a good place for me.  My memories continue to live on and I often look back with fondness to those days at Kallman Home.  There I learned to play a musical instrument, had opportunity to learn from caring people, enjoyed friendships with fellow residentials, and enjoyed experioences beyond that which my parents could have offered.
Again, thanks for beginning this good work.
Jack Wahlberg

And still more (is there no end to this guy’s memory?)

Arnie,
The pictures on this Website will get more numerous as people dig into their files and boxes hidden away in attics or basements.  It is fun seeing the site evolve.
I think I remember someone raising chickens at Kallman Home.  It came to mind as I looked at the picture of Kallman Home on the Home page.  The side stairs on the boys side of the Home led to a narrow area between the Home and the Fence on 85th Street. I think it was under the directorship of Fred Persiko and I vaguely remember the Dietz boys getting chicks at Easter and then raising them in cages. Memory is not clear but perhaps you recall or perhaps Charlie or Al might have some recollection.
Another memory is the Mulberry Tree along side the driveway in the fenced off play area.  I remember climbing the tree and jumping from one branch to another way up high in the tree.  Of course, time alters details so it may not have been that high but at the time it sure seemed high.
Then there were some who created villages in the dirt and used little cars and trucks in a scenario that their imaginations brought to life.  Faces and names elude me but perhaps someone remembers doing that sort of play.
Well, that’s it for now.  I hope that you are enjoying life!
Jack

Oh, wait, I almost forgot:  (yeah right):

It is a truth that if you key in to an area of memory that it triggers even more memories than were first remembered.  I find that is true with writing about family history (a project I am undertaking for my children and their offspring as well as other relatives abroad).  So in light of this another memory has surfaced.
I remember that there were bushes on south side of the Kallman Home building that were some 25 feet or so out onto the lawn and on these bushes were little black seeds that made excellent ammunition for a pea shooter (or is that peashooter?) and we used to collect the little black seeds and use them in confrontations from time to time.  I also remember that those bushes provided shade on a hot day and those cool places were fun places to spend some time with a friend or two while collecting the seeds.
Another memory is that of the “midnight raid” to the kitchen, while avoiding the night watchman.  When the various bakeries donated pastries to Kallman Home we put them in the kitchen and they were reason enough to make us skulk down to the kitchen in the midnight hour and sample the tasty treats.
Oh, some of the closets in the Home were keyed with Skeleton Keys.  A generic key (set of two I believe) was available at Woolworths on 86th Street between 4th and 5th Avenues.  I am not sure what was so valuable in those closets but they was a target for those who had a key.
There were some memories that were extremely juvenile but that is what we were at the time.  The “North Star” who could be viewed from the Church Room east windows was a thrill for many. The very bold at times would go to the roof and peer into the skylight over the girls bath area when the girls were showering and see what they could see.  I never participated in that (that I can recall) but those who did may have found the steam blocked a clear view

You have done a good thing by starting this Website.  It is terrific.

E-mail: Bror8588@aol.com 

From Thomas (Tommy) Mather

Pastor, Calvary Deaf Church – Riverside, California

Looking at the pictures from Kallman and your mom caused me to think. I remember Christmas times at the Brooklyn Navy Yard and dinner on the Navy ships; Easter shopping  at Robert Halls for our new duds; summer @ Coney Island and Jones Beach.  We sure were blessed. I remember marching in the band for the first time @ Swedish events when my tuba filled with water; slap ball in the courtyard; stick ball and the neighbors yelling about our climbing the fence to retrieve balls; about Saturday night bakery runs in Don Arbitter’s station wagon; playing chicken on the Belt Parkway; the Fort Hamilton cannon. Wow all stored up for years.  I also remember our moms working there; Bea in the laundry and mine in the nursery for awhile. That’s all for now but oh yes not to forget meeting the girls near the laundry where band instruments were stored. Just remembering.

Later he wrote: (sort of shorthand)

Have you found any more Kallmanites?  We are in a building process here in California.  There are several memories:  my Cousin Dimple as nurse at the home, later my mother became the nurse, I believe she helped you or your brother with your arm unable to remember think you broke it. ( it was me Tommy) the different times at Easter and Christmas time going to different places like navy ships, for dinner, Coney Island, slap ball in the yard, band trying to march, my tuba filled with water while marching for the Swedish parade, Easter weekend going to Robert Hall’s for new outfits, yes and also camp at the Word of LIfe Island two or  three weeks during summers. I guess the staff was glad to have the building for themselves.  our clothes on the tables all had to be marked because some of the initials of the boys and girls clothing were the same and would get mixed up when at camp.  TV room was great in the chapel.  beans for breakfast, lunch, supper, working carrying potatoes and supplies from the storage to the kitchen,  Friday  nite going or Sat nites going to different bakeries for donations, cuz they were closed on Sunday.  our basketball teams boys only –  one player was really good I think it was Robert.  washing the stair, cleaning dishes, fast eating so no one else would take what we had, stick ball, our neighbors thought we were always invading their land because we were chasing our balls hit over the fence. I think i could elaborate on some of these points, and write a book someday. but time does not permit. Robert Farrrel and Marie incident during band practice.  
Well that is all for now. my email has changed cdcmather@att.net give me a few text message to renew friendships.  if you hear from any of the friends have them email, i think this is extended family members.  Tom Mather  

Lana Schettino Clancy writes:

I’m sorry to say I don’t have any pictures left but I was at Kallman in 1955 with my brother Norman Levie. I sang in the choir and remember going to Hunter College and other places to perform.. I was singled out to take a picture with Herb Shelton at the time. He was big doings then…I remember I found a dead bird and put it in a shoe box and buried it on the front lawn (the knoll)….I hadn’t realized Kallman became Adelphi Academy.  I was in a car and it stopped at the corner and I looked over and saw Adelphi. It took my breath away. I realized I was looking at Kallman…It has always been with me and I have snippets of memories.Thanks for listening,

Lana  Clancy (Lana Schettino circa 1955)And later she wrote:

Hi again Arnie
Thank you for replying…I moved to NJ for many years but always wanted to come back to Brooklyn..It took awhile but now I am back…I hadnt realized I moved so close to The Home…I really dont remember too many people I think I was too young..My brother may have better luck..We were there in 1955 and 56..We have the same mother but different fathers so his last name is different..Norman Levie..He was in the band..They mis-spelled his name in the photo…I was young and goofy…When the car stopped at the light 2 days ago and I realized where I was I just lost it…I dont remember many people and for that Im sorry but to me everyone there was family..We are a group apart from most…I remember my brother would come home and tell me he bumped into someone he knew at The Home…years later..I will check the site from time to time…I love looking at the photos even though I didnt know who they were..I do remember the inside and the courtyard..The laundry room and the dorms and the big closets and the easter outfits etc..A lot of what everyone else remembers…We used to watch Bandstand..A few of the older guys and girls decided to teach me how to dance..I was their pet project..I loved it..They taught me well and to this day I love to dance and I love all music..from the 40’s to present day such as Maroon 5…Take care and Thanks again for getting back to me..
Lana

Alex Tenentes – LaJolla, CA writes:

Editor’s note:  When I received this first message from Alex in April 2009, I was completely overwhelmed and humbled by what he had to say.  The point being that one never knows exactly who, when, or how you might have touched or influenced someone else’s life, in this case over fifty-three years ago.  It blessed me beyond measure and continues to do so.  In fact, his words were the main force behind my decision to return to the trumpet after many decades of musical frustration.  I am now on a great adventure with my new Bach Stradivarious trumpet and my goal is to eventually play in our church’s brass ensemble. 

I can remember wanting to play just like Robert Bjork could.  Man was he great on the trumpet.

Thank you Alex…

OH, MY GOD, ARNOLD!! YOU WERE MY IDOL AND I TRIED TO COPY YOU. I, LIKE YOU, TOOK TRUMPET LESSONS FROM BOB FARRELL, ROSE TO BECOME SOLO TRUMPETER IN HIGH SCHOOL, AND WAS THE TRUMPET SOLOIST FOR THE BROOKLYN BOROUGH BAND UNDER MR. DELVECCHIO. IN COLLEGE, I ALSO, PLAYED SOLO TRUMPET, AND AFTER MY STINT IN THE AIR FORCE, WENT TO JULLIARD SCHOOL OF MUSIC WHERE I INTENSIFIED MY TRUMPETING. AFTER GRADUATING FROM JULLIARD, I DID A BRIEF STINT WITH THE BOSTON POPS ORCHESTRA, AND CUT A RECORD PLAYING “A TRUMPETER’S LULLABY,” AND THE “TRUMPET CONCERTO IN E FLAT.”

I REMEMBER YOU AS A YOUNG TRUMPETER AT KALLMAN, AND THAT IS WHY I TOOK UP THE TRUMPET……I WANTED TO BE AS GOOD AS ARNOLD DAHL.

I REMEMBER YOU, JOHN AND YOUR SWEET MOM WHO WAS ALWAYS GENTLE WITH ME AND MY BROTHER PUGGY. MY NAME IS……ALEX TENENTES, AND MY BROTHER AND I WERE AT KALLMAN FROM 1954 THROUGH 1957. MY HOUSE PARENT WAS MR. LOCKWOOD, BUT I STARTED OUT WITH MR. AND MRS. COLBY, WHO HAD THAT APARTMENT DOWN THE HILL.

I PLAYED STICKBALL WITH EDDIE AND WALTER BACH FOR YEARS AFTER WE WERE OUT OF KALLMAN. WE PLAYED RIGHT ACROSS THE STREET FROM KALLMAN IN THE P.S. 185 SCHOOL YARD.

I REMEMBER CLARENCE HILL, MET HIM IN VIET-NAM, AND IN CASE YOU DID NOT KNOW, CLARENCE WAS KILLED IN ACTION SHORTLY AFTER HE ARRIVED. HE HAD A HEART OF GOLD AS BIG AS HE WAS.

I REMEMBER FREDDY, TONY, AURORA, AND ANITA PEREZ, NILS OLAFFSSON, JAMES AND PATRICK HERMES, TINA MANEELY,

LORRAINE HEGALAND, SAM AND PAT FOGLER, RALPH ANNUNZIATTA, JIMMY PETERSON, RICHARD WISE, WHOM I REMAINED FRIENDS WITH FOR YEARS AFTER WE LEFT KALLMAN, HIS BROTHER, ARTHUR, DAVID SUOMINEN, AL; DIETZ, AND SOME OF THE GIRLS IN THE BAND.

I’M MARRIED FOR 30 YEARS, HAVE 4 GROWN CHILDREN, LIVE IN SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, AND WILL NOT RETIRE!!!

ARNOLD, LET ME HEAR FROM YOU.

ALEX TENENTES

Alex also wrote:

Do you really want to know how I found you? I just happened to put my trumpet away after cleaning it, and just on a whim, punched in your name on “Google Images,” and the first picture that came up on my screen was Arnie Dahl in an Air Force flight uniform. Remembering how you looked growing up, I said to myself……”Yeah, I know this is definitely Arnie!”

Looking at the web site brought tears to my eyes as early on at Kallman proved to be a traumatic period in my life time. However, I owe most of my sanity to Bob Farrell, who for some reason, took a liking to me, and after one of your band rehearsals in the dining room, came over to where I was sitting and asked me if I liked music? To this day, I remember my response: “Yeah….and I want to play like Arnold!” He smiled that infectious smile, and told me he would be talking to me soon. The following day, he found me outside “attempting” to play basketball, and took me up the front stairs and into the auditorium. He took out a cornet from the case, put it in my hands, and asked me, “Son…are you ready?”

From that point on, it was hard work, tears, as he would not let up during my lessons. “Tighten those cheeks! I want you to slur the entire scale!”

My dad just passed on his past January, and he remained friends with the Persico’s until they left Barney Bray. We would visit them often during the late 50’s and 60’s but lost track of them after they left Barney Bray. Buddy and Bobby remained close until they too, seemed to vanish off of the face of the earth.

Memories of Kallman? Ah, gee, I can write forever. Let me kick in a few more names for you:

* Rose Morales

* Helen Ross

* Leo Garnto

* Linda and Lorraine Hegland

* James and Patrick Hermes

* Nancy Peterson (Jimmy’s sister)

* Frank Weldon

* Harold Hogland

Staff Members

* Felix Bloomquist. His is a sad story. After he left Kallman, he lived somewhere in Bay Ridge, as he would always stop my dad and

I on the avenue to preach a little gospel. I know, eventually, he wound up homeless because I would often see him on 5th avenue in front of Century 21. We lived on 86th street between 3rd and 4th forever!

* David Wong. He was a “house parent gone bad,” and he eventually was asked to leave after getting into it with one of the “senior guys.”

Don’t quite remember who it was he beat up, but Wong was both a martial arts expert as well as a fabulous ping pong player.

* Dolores Beauchamp! (Tony’s wife). If you remember, Arnie, she was also the Kallman nurse. I remember everyone wanting to get sick so that we could lay in the infirmary looking at Dolores!!!

* Speaking of Tony Beauchamp, went he would be up in the dorm, he would tell us Navy stories about his time in the Navy, and his days spent on a submarine. I Remember one story in particular, where he told us he was on a silent run, and the man sure could tell a story.

* Mr. Persico would read us stories, but my favorite was Mr. Colby reading us “Tom Sawyer.” The man could tell or read a story that kept you interested. Truthfully, I wasn’t too fond of Mary Colby, but it was a mutual dislike on both sides.

* Don Arbiter, from my memory, was a huge Detroit Tiger fan, and we would always tell him that our Yankees were “Boss!” He would argue with Richard Wise and myself for hours about the skill and virtue of the Detroit Tigers. Don, was probably the few people that I really trusted aside from Bob Farrell. Mr. Lockwood, was a nice man, but as bit perverted for my taste.

Richard Brastad Wise and I remained friends well into the late 70s. He happened to marry a girl I was going steady with at Fort Hamilton High, a girl named Lee Russell, but the marriage fizzled out after I returned home from the Air Force, where I served as a FAC! After completing jump school at Fort Benning Georgia, I was assigned to the 501st Direct Air Assault Group, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C. I remained at Shaw for a year, and in 1966, was deployed to Viet-Nam, and served two tours. I met Clarence Hill at Khe San, and he hugged me like I was his brother.  He was killed in action.

Sam Fogler and I remained friends after I left Kallman, he was a big fan of my dad’s, but Sam had a troubled life and wound up behind bars. Pat, his sister, got married, but I never saw her once I left Kallman.

Eddie and Walter Bock would team up against me and a friend of mine every Sunday for about 3 years playing stickball at P.S. 185. Walter, eventually could not do it any longer, and it seemed like Eddie could play forever. I loved the two of them!

I have more memories, and I will divulge them at my next writing.

Thanks for responding, Arnie. As I said…..you were my hero, and definitely an inspiration to me, and someone I tried to emulate.  You came from good stock and I adored your mom, who worked so hard at the laundry. She was an endearing woman, and I do not think she had an enemy in the world. I also, remember “BIG JOHN” Dahl as well.

God bless and keep you and yours!!!

Linda Waisala – Mercado writes:

I lived at Kallman Home from 1957 through 1960 or 1961.  My name then was Linda Waisala.  I doubt you would remember me as I was not particularly popular or memorable in any way.  I was one of few “private” cases in the home so I never really fit in with the rest of the kids(not my choice).  I do remember your mom and several of the names listed.  These are names that go back so many years and have given birth to memories I thought were gone forever.
I resided in the “green room” with Mrs. Hines (?Heinz?) when I first came to the home then I went to the “blue room” with Mrs. Deech (or Deitz)as I got older.  I remember the Bennett family-Mary Ann, Michael, Geraldine, Linda & David, Jean and Andy Kliarski, Helen Ross, Tina, Chiquita & Norman Maneely, Lorraine & Linda Heglund, Paul Abilquist, Robert Elliot (didn’t he have a brother?), Valerie Trinka also had a brother but his name escapes me, Rudy, James & Leo Garnto(James was in the band), Anita & Freddie Perez(the twins), Mark Nelson(his mom & my dad were dating), Rose Morales (played piano at the concerts). Glad to hear that Carl & Marie got married, but sad to hear that Carl passed away.  Marie was really nice.  I had a crush on David Suominen and always wondered what happened to him.  I can remember being thrilled when Gilbert Reed asked me to dance with him.  He was one of the “real cool” older guys and only danced with girls who were good dancers.
As I write this many things are coming back to me.  I wish I had pictures to share with you but they were lost over the years.  Some of the spelling of the names I must have gotten wrong.  After all I was only 10 years old when I got there.  Did “Uncle” Don marry the nice girl who came to teach Bible study?  She had a brace on her leg.  I can’t remember her name just yet.
I would love to hear from you.
Linda Mercado

Diane Palm writes:

Hello Mr. Dahl,
I’ve been trying to find some information regarding the Kallman Home for a long time but was never very successful until I found your website tonight. My father & his 2 older brothers grew up in the Kallman Home until they left at 16. My father & his brothers were there much earlier than your mother, but there may be others who remember them.
My father was George Palm & his brothers were Robert or Bob & Ernie. Unfortunately, my father passed away in 1986 & my uncle Bob a few years later, but my Uncle Ernie is still alive at almost 91 years old!
I just returned from a visit with him & on the last day, this past Sunday in fact, we went to the home in Brooklyn with him. He still lives in NY, out on Long Island & is going strong. He is in great shape & is as sharp as can be. He still remembers in great detail the layout of the building & his life there. We were fortunate to go inside, & he knew exactly where everything was supposed to be. We climbed up 2 flights of stairs to where he said he slept, the large room that had several other boys in it, to the lower floors where they ate their meals.
My uncle was at the original school & remembers they had to move because they were building a road through where the school was located. He also talked about how he & my dad were sent to one place & my Uncle Bob was sent to another while they were building the new building. Once it was built, they were all gathered up & moved back together into the new building in 1931.
I would love to find out if there are any official records to be found during that time period. They would have been there beginning from 1924 approximately. I do have some old pictures I got from my uncle but I think they’re only of my dad & his brothers, but you might be interested.
Best wishes & Happy Holidays,
Diane Palm

Darlene Krowl (aka Chiquita Maneely) writes:

The Maneely’s:  Our years in the home were from approximately 1952 until about 1961. Our brother arrived after us as he was too young, and then stayed a year longer. I tend to think of the home as “before” and “after” the Scotts arrived. I remember once when Anita Perez, myself and a couple of other young girls were having a pretend tea party on the front lawn. Mrs. Persiko saw us and went and made some kool-aid and filled our plastic teacups and joined our party. This was so special that I remember it til this day. I believe we may have been one of the first “city cases”, or at least this is what Beverly Werner told me many years later. Her younger sister Maureen and I were inseparable best friends. I think they tried to be so fair that they even treated  their own children with the same rules. If I’m not mistaken I think their sons even lived in the dorms. You guys would know this better than me, but I seem to recall this.  Mr. Colby was a real sweetheart, and I have to agree with Alex Tenentes regarding Mrs. Colby. She could be quite mean. I started out in the “Nursery Room” which only held about six beds. Mrs. Hanson was the housemother and she had two daughters Tanya and Luanna. From there to the Green Room until my sister and I left. (I should say kicked out as Mr. Scott didn’t allow us back after we played hooky and went to visit our mom) He told us we made our bed so go lay in it, and never to set foot on the home property again! I have fond memories of Mrs. Sackela and Mrs. Hines. That was not an easy job, and they managed to be strict but fair. I personally never cared for Mrs. Bindrum. She had her favorites, and if you weren’t one of them she could be mean. More than once she took something from me to “keep safe” and I never saw it again. One item that I received from a “secret pal” was a Toni doll and she had made several outfits for it. It was the nicest thing I ever had. Binny took it and although she totally intimidated me I asked and asked for it until one day she gave me a totally junk doll and said that is what she put away for me. She also had a bad habit of poking people with her long painted fingernails! She would actually tell us that she used to have all pretty lovely little “blonde haired” girls, and now they were sending “anything”…. I remember being so surprised that there were 3 meals daily, and that everyone had their own bed. We came from a situation where my mother and all three children slept in the same bed!….So many parties in the beginning, and the circus, rodeo, ice capades, steeplechase. We sometimes got out of school early to be able to go…We played hopscotch, jump rope, jacks, also a ball game against the wall where there was a king, queen, and jack spot. I can’t recall the name. Things all seemed to go downhill when the Scotts took over as directors. I played the Eflat horn, and although I was never in the Kallman band as I think it had basically disbanded at that point in time, I did make the All Borough Band, but had to drop out as I didn’t have the change for bus fare and Mr. Scott wouldn’t give it to me.  I could tell so many horror stories, but don’t even like thinking about most of those times. I am grateful that there were some good people who taught us good values….So, some good memories and some not so good, but lots of people and we were basicly in the same boat and we were family. I’m sorry Linda that you didn’t think you were very memorable. I tried over the years to find you many times as we were best friends and you were very memorable to me! (Alex, I was sorry to see your post regarding Clarence Hill) I’m glad you ran into him while you were in Nam. I do remember him. ….Darlene Krowl (aka Chiquita Maneely)

Norman Maneely writes:

 THINGS I REMEMBERED: IT WAS A HUGE SURPRISE TO FIND THAT A WEBSITE HAS BEEN CREATED FOR THE KALLMAN HOME FOR CHILDREN.  FIFTY ODD YEARS AGO; IT SEEMS SO LONG AGO. I HAVE PASSED BY THE KALLMAN HOME MANY TIMES SINCE THE DAY I WAS ABLE TO RETURN TO MY FAMILY. WHEN YOU SEE THIS MASSIVE STRUCTURE APPEAR IN YOUR LINE OF VISION YOU ARE AWED EACH & EVERYTIME BY ITS CITADEL APPEARENCE. I HAD ENTERED THE HOME ONE YEAR AFTER MY TWO SISTERS TINA & DARLENE BECAUSE I WASNT THE PROPER AGE. THIS WAS AROUND 1953/54 I BELIEVE. I HAD SPENT THAT TIME OF SEPARATION FROM MY SISTERS IN A CATHOLIC ORPHANAGE. THE PERSIKO’S WERE IN RESIDENCE THEN. I VAGUELY REMEMBER THEM. I REMEMBER MRS.COLBY, MR. LOCKWOOD AND BOB FARRELL AS HOUSEPARENTS AND THERE WERE MORE BUT I CAN’T PLACE NAMES. AS FOR OTHER CHILDREN I DO REMEMBER THE PEREZ’ S ,ANITA & FREDDY, THE PETERSON;S NANCY & JIMMY, THE WISE BROTHERS,RICHARD & ARTHUR; SAM & PAT FOGLER; THE BENNETT’S, BOB ELLIOT & CLARENCE HILL. BOTH KIDS & ADULTS WOULD COME AND GO. THERE WAS MORE ACTIVITY AT THE HOME IN THE EARLY YEARS THAN IN MY FINAL TIME THERE. THE KALLMAN BAND USED TO PERFORM AT VARIOUS CONCERTS. I REMEMBER PLAYING OUTSIDE AND YOU COULD HEAR THEM PRACTICING UP IN THE AUDITORIUM ON THE 2ND FLOOR. I WASNT MUSICALLY TALENTED, BUT DARLENE WAS. I REMEMBER PILING INTO THAT DARK BLUE TRUCK AND GOING TO CONEY ISLAND OR TO DIFFERENT STORES. THERE WERE BAZAARS,& DIFFERENT FUND-RAISER EVENTS THAT WE ATTENDED. WE WENT AWAY EVERY SUMMER TO CAMP JOY IN CARMEL,NEW YORK, AND THE TRIPS TO STEEPLECHASE PARK SPONSORED BY THE N.Y.C.POLICEMANS BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. I ATTENDED P.S.185 ACROSS THE STREET & MRS. SHINDELL WAS THE PRINCIPAL. I HAD IN MY EARLY YEARS THERE CAUGHT THE WHOOPING COUGH AROUND EARLY MARCH EACH YEAR LIKE CLOCKWORK AND SPENT MY TIME IN THE INFIRMERY, WHICH AT THAT TIME WAS ON THE 2FLOOR NEXT TO THE DOORWAY LEADING TO THE KITCHEN. I REMEMBER THE DIFFERENT PLAYGROUNDS WE HAD. I REMEMBER THE HOT DAYS WHEN THEY PUT ON THE WATER SPRINKLER AND WE WOULD GET SOAKED. ALSO, THE YEARLY TREKS TO ROBERT HALL FOR OUR EASTER ATTIRE. WE USED TO HAVE TO CLEAN THE KITCHEN BY DUSTING & MOPPING EACH NIGHT TO PREPARE IT FOR THE NEXT DAYS USE. WE TOOK TURNS AT THIS ASSIGNMENT. THE BOYS BEDROOMS{3 TO BE EXACT} WERE RIGHT ABOVE THE KITCHEN. THE BOYS ABOVE USED TO LOWER A GUNNYSACK BY ROPE TO THE BOY IN THE KITCHEN AND HE WOULD FILL IT WITH GOODIES, TIGHTEN THE DRAWSTRING AND YANK ON THE ROPE FOR THE BOYS TO HOIST UP THE BAG. WE ALSO SENT DOWN SEPARATELY A EMPTY JAR WITH A CAP WHICH WOULD BE FILLED WITH COFFEE OR WHATEVER DRINK WAS AVAILABLE {JUICE/WATER} AND IT TOO WOULD BE SENT BACK UP OUTSIDE THE BUILDING. THIS WENT ON FOR AWHILE TILL WE GOT CAUGHT. THE NEIGHBOR ACROSS THE STREET ON 85TH STREET WAS CURIOUS AS TO WHY THERE WAS A EITHER A GUNNYSACK OR A JAR GOING UP AND DOWN. THERE WAS AN EVENT THAT OCCURRED THAT WILL ALWAYS STAY WITHIN MY MIND. JIMMY PETERSON AND MYSELF WERE DOWN ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE DRIVEWAY ON THE 86TH STREET SIDE ON THIS VERY COLD WINTER DAY. WE HAD JUST COME FROM SCHOOL ACROSS THE STREET. IT HAD SNOWED A FEW DAYS EARLIER AND REALLY FREEZING WEATHER HAD MADE THE SNOW THAT HAD ALREADY FALLEN VERY SOLID & ICY. WE WERE APPROACHED BY 3 OLDER NEIGHBORHOOD BOYS WHO WERE LOOKING FOR TROUBLE AND JUST AT THAT MOMENT, A CITY BUS WAS COMING ON THE SCHOOL SIDE HEADING TOWARDS 4TH AVE. THESE BOYS TURNED THERE ATTENTION TO THE ON COMING BUS AND DECIDED TO MAKE IT A TARGET FOR SNOWBALLS, WHICH THEY BEGAN THROWING IN RAPID SUCCESSION. THE BUS DRIVER HAD OPENED HIS WINDOW AND WAS STRUCK ON THE SIDE OF HIS HEAD WITH AN ICEBALL. HE STOPPED THE BUS, GOT OFF THE BUS AND MADE HIS WAY TOWARDS US CURSING & YELLING AND WAVING HIS ARMS. THE OTHER KIDS TOOK OFF. I JUST STOOD THERE FOR A FEW SECONDS THINKING I DIDN’T GET INVOLVED IN THE FIRST PLACE. WHEN THIS BUS DRIVER WAS NEARING I THEN REALIZED FROM THE LOOK ON HIS FACE THAT IT WAS TIME TO GET GOING WHICH I DID. UP THE DRIVEWAY WE WENT.  MR. SCOTT, WHO WAS THE DIRECTOR, MUST HAVE SEEN SOME OF THIS BECAUSE JIMMY & I WERE SUMMONED TO HIS OFFICE. WE WERE JUST IN THE WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME. HE GAVE US A FINE. ON A CARD HE WOULD WRITE AN AMOUNT SUCH AS $20.00 AND IF YOU HAD MONEY {WHO HAD MONEY?} YOU PAID IT. IF NOT, YOU HAD TO DO CHORES FOR DOUBLE THE AMOUNT WHICH WOULD BE 40 HOURS. YOU WERE SUPERVISED FOR TIME SPENT ON THESE CHORES AND WE DECIDED THAT THIS WAS TOTALLY UNFAIR. SO JIMMY & I DIDN’T WORK ANY CHORES. MR SCOTT APPROACHED US SOMETIME LATER AND WHEN HE SAW THAT WE DIDN’T DO ANY CHORES WE WERE MARCHED TO HIS OFFICE. WE STILL INSISTED THAT WE HAD DONE NO WRONG BUT HE WAS ADAMANT AND WE WERE BEATEN WITH A SIZE13 – TRIPLE E SNEAKER ON OUR BUTTS. WHAT WERE WE TO DO, KEEP GETTING SNEAKER WHIPPED OR WORK THE CHORES SOWE CHOSE TO DO THE CHORES. YEARS, LATER MR.SCOTT WAS ARRESTED FOR STEALING. A FEW YEARS AFTER I LEFT THE HOME THEN IT CLOSED.

 I MUST SAY THOUGH THAT THERE WERE MORE GOOD TIMES THAN BAD.

Sincerely Norman Maneely

——————–

Dear Arnie.

My name is Stu Cameron and I have to commend you on your Kallman Home website. I came upon it as I was searching the net for Camp Whittaker, Camp Joy and Camp Hope (Lakeside Bible Conference/Childrens’ Bible Fellowship, Carmel, New York) where I was a camper in the late 1950s-early 1960s. I have an affiliation with the Kallman Home, having spent 11 years of my life in a sister- home in Brooklyn- the Baptist Childrens’ Home of Long Island, 2360 Ocean Avenue, Brooklyn. I lived there from 1954-1965. I left there to go to Barrington College, Rhode Island from where I graduated in 1969 and became a public school teacher in New Jersey before going into the business and political world.

While at the “Home” I shared similar experiences to those experienced at the Kallman Home, including annual (June) trips to Steeplechase Park, Coney Island by the NYPD Anchor Club and Palisades Amusement Park in New Jersey and Jaycee (then called the Jr. Chamber of Commerce) sponsored Christmas Shopping Tours at Macy’s. Gimbel’s and A&S.

In fact, some of the staff of the BCH came from the Kallman Home. Our Executive Director, Lawson C. Hanson and his family worked at the Kallman Home in the 1950s. I believe he was a cook there. They were originally from Fredericton, Canada, where Mr.Hanson was a chef. (Lawson and his wife Luella are both deceased ) I also knew the Colbys. I was unaware that Howard Colby was your Acting Director until I read the Kallman Home history on your website. We all knew him as “Uncle Howard” He was a stamp collector and both he and I used to trade stamps together. When I knew him he was a bank security guard at the executive offices of Chase Bank in Manhattan and had an affiliation with David Rockefeller (Nelson Rockefeller’s brother-Nelson was Governor of New York and eventually Vice President of the United States under President Nixon.)

Uncle Howard sadly succumbed to open heart surgery in the 1960’s and was survived by his wife Mary Colby. She was known to us as Aunt Mary and was the Girls’ House Mother. They also had a married daughter, who was a nurse-whose name I have forgotten. The last time I saw Aunt Mary was while I was in college, as she had come to Rhode Island to visit a cousin who worked at the college.

I also attended the Bay Ridge Baptist Church for a while before the “Home” decided to send us to the Kings Highway Baptist Church and Baptist Church of the Redeemer, which were in closer proximity to the “Home.” After the Hanson’s left the “Home” in the mid-60s the “Home” went through several directors, but found the number of resident children diminishing. The “Home” closed its doors in the 1970s and the property was sold. On its location stands a high rise apartment building (no longer 2360 Ocean Avenue) and the “Home” is but a fleeting memory to those of us who lived there.

I will continue to view your website and will share the information with my sister, who also resided at the Home and knew the Colby’s very well. Keep up the good effort.

All the best,
Stu

From Darlene:  Hi Arnie, I spoke with Linda Heggelund recently, and she sent me this photograph taken for a concert program. The year is 1956. It’s in bad shape, but was in even worse, so took it to my photoshop program and removed some of the creases. I think it’s a good find for the Kallman site.  In the back row, Norman Maneely, Linda Heggelund, Valerie Trnka and Bobby Persiko. In the front row, first boy on left I don’t recall, Lana Schettino, next I’m not sure, next is Annette Smarek, and not sure of the last boy. Could you send me Lanas email and also Annettes if you have it. I had them both, but seem to have misplaced them, and wanted to send them a copy of this. Thanks. If you can only post pictures by my sending them regular post office, let me know and I will do that. Thanks and hope all is well by you. Darlene

Some History - an old postcard

From Chris Houghton

(Bergen County, NJ)

Hi Arnie,

You asked for me to remind you of the stuff I had sent before and I’ve copied that stuff here.

I remember many of the names of those you pictured on your website.  As others come to mind, I’ll let you know.  I use Chris now, rather than Kit… J

After I left Kallman in about 1955, I was put into Leake & Watts Children’s home in Yonkers, on the Bronx/Yonkers fline near the Hudson River.  I was there 2 years, and it wasn’t as good as Kallman, especially at Christmas time…J  They had a big campus, and individual cottages each with 7-15 kids and it was Episcopalian.  It was a colder environment though.

From there I went to live with my mother and stepfather in NYC on 33rd Street and 3rd Avenue!  True!  I went to eschool on the schoolship SS John W. Brown that was moored at the 25th Street pier.  They taught Merchant Marine trades.  When I was 17 ½ I enlisted in the USCG and did Search and Rescue for 5 years on 5 different ships.  I was stationed at ports along the Atlantic coast and then the Gulf coast in Texas.  I worked in the engine room on large diesels and other machines like refrigeration equipment.  When I came back to NYC I lived on the upper west side on 87th Street and I got into computers.  I worked my way up from apprentice operator to Senior VP of Company Operations, then became a consultant to companies in New Jersey where I live now.  I did that for many years, until a couple years ago.

I remember Mr. Persiko taking over from Sacher, and what a difference it made.  I think I was most familiar with the kids in the Church room while I was there in 1950-1955.  I remember you, but I think you were in the Barnavaennen room at that time, yes?

A random memory comes to me that there was a houseparent named Smith that was called ‘Smitty’?  He was a shorter black man, and he loved to whip up on kids that were bad with his garrison belt while we had to stand at the foot of our bed and take it.  Sound familiar?

I remember your mother as the nice lady in the laundry room… J

And on the ‘humorous’ side, I remember breakfast one day when we had gotten a donation from the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  It was some kind of hot cereal.  When they made it and served it out, all the kids were going ‘Yuck’ and choking.  There were 6 legged bugs in the hot cereal.  Probably some kind of weevil that made the cereal go bad, and the Navy got rid of it to us.  I remember someone in charge announced to everyone that the cereal had been cooked so it was sterilized and was safe to eat.  Not too many ate that morning though… J

I remember the Cameron twins, and Heather, who had to do a gypsy dance with me at PS 185 in the auditorium.

I remember many people like a guy name Tony Rasmussen who I hung out with for a while.  I also remember Dave Suominen who had a birthday one day before me… mine was November 13th, and his was 12th.

I remember everyone wanting to be chosen for a donation run to the local bakeries when they had day old bread to give us.

I remember at about age 10 that I was hanging upside down on the slide in the back area, and I fell and landed on my mouth and chipped a tooth.  Boy, did I yell…J  There was no dental repair at the time, and I lived with that chip for years until I was a teen.

I remember one Christmas many of us going to the Brooklyn Navy Yard and going aboard the USS Oriskany, an aircraft carrier.  The sailors gave us a great big Christmas meal and lots of presents.  I saw on TV the other day where they sunk the Oriskany at sea to become a reef for fishes.  It was too old to serve.  On the bus trip out to the ship, the bus was going along the dock and it was very old and a large timber ran over the rear wheel and slammed up through the floor of the bus and popped girls up out of their seat and the timber stopped 2 feet in front of my face.  Scary

Just between you and I, I was one of the fellows that used to go to the roof at night after lights out and look down the skylight.

I remember going to Robert Hall near Easter each year and getting a suit, then wearing it the rest of the year.

Memories come back to me on a casual basis and at random, but I’ll keep in touch… J

If anyone remembers me, tell them to email.

Arnie, you can edit anything here that you might need to…I’m looking forward to seeing all that stuff in print…J

See ya,

Chris

Email: flamed@optonline.net

Phone: 201-497-5515

 

From: Arnie Dahl [mailto:apdahl@cox.net]
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 6:41 PM
To: ‘flamed’
Subject: RE: Kallman Additions

 

HI Chris,

 

No, they are not lost; I just haven’t spent much time on the site lately.  And now it is duck season here in Oklahoma, so that is where all my energy and concentration is focused.

Remind me Chris; was the material simply your “memories of Kallman” or something else?  All the materials folks have sent me through the years is safely stored in the Kallman Home file on my desktop as well as on an internet storage site.  So not to worry.  Just bring me up to date, OK?

I hope you had a nice Thanksgiving and I wish you a very Merry Christmas.

Arnie

 

From: flamed [mailto:flamed@optonline.net]
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2010 1:29 PM
To: apdahl@cox.net
Subject: Kallman Additions

Arnie,

I keep looking at the Kallman site and not seeing the additions I sent you.  If they are lost, would you like me to send them again?

Chris (‘Kit’) Houghton

A trip down the Brooklyn memory lane

Enjoy these memories.

Brooklyn Map

BROOKLYN
1. The subway, bus and the trolley were only a thin dime to ride, and if you are really old, you’ll remember a nickel a ride.
86th Street Subway Station
2. Schools were the showcase for the whole country.
3. Tuesday night was fireworks night in Coney Island put on by Schaefer Brewing.
4. There was very little pornography.
5. There were the bath houses: Stauches, Bushman Baths, Steeplechase Baths, Washington Baths, Ravenhall, and Brighton Beach Baths.
6. There was respect for teachers and older people in general.
7. There was almost no violence.
8. The theme of the music of the times, even when it became rock and  roll, was love not anger.
9. A great day was going to the beach at Coney Island, or Brighton.
ConeyIslandBeachCrowd

10. People made a living and, rich or poor, people all knew how to have a good time no matter of status.
11. There was no better hot dog than the original at Nathan’s in Coney Island. And no better French fries than the Nathan’s thick ripple cuts.
NathansOriginal

12. There were no divorces and few “one parent” families.
13. There were no drugs or drug problems in the lives of most people.
14. The rides and shows of Coney Island were fantastic: Steeplechase Park: the horses, the big slide, the barrels, the zoo (maze), the human pool table, the Cyclone Roller Coaster, the Tornado Roller Coaster, the
Thunderbolt Roller Coaster, the Bobsled, the Virginia Reel, the Wonder
Wheel, the Bumper cars, the Tunnel of love, Battaway, the loop the loop,
the bubble bounce, miniature golf, the whip, the many merry-go-rounds,
the penny arcades. Luna Park, the Thompson Roller Coaster, the Parachute jump, Fabers Sportsland and Fascination, toffee and cotton candy stores, custard stands, Pokerama, Skeeball, prize games, fortune tellers guess games, hammer games, the Harlem revue, the freak shows, the house of wax, the animal nursery,restaurants, rifle
ranges, push cart rides and parades.
Steeplechase ride Steeple chase Park The Cyclone Wonder Wheel
15. The fruit man, the tool sharpener, the junk man and the watermelon man all with the horse and wagon.
Fruit wagons Freight Wagon
16. Sheepshead Bay was Lundy’s Restaurant and fishing.
Lundys
17. Only place for pizza and only whole pizzas was Joe’s Bar and Grill on Ave U. Then in the mid-50’s, a pizza explosion: you could buy it by the slice for a dime at many places. By the late 50’s it was a whole 15 cents a slice! A tuna fish sandwich or a BLT were 45 cents. A small Coke was 7 cents, a large Coke was 12 cents. Remember Vanilla Cokes when they pumped real vanilla syrup into the glass before adding the Coke?
Soda fountain
18. There were many theaters where every Saturday afternoon you could see 25 cartoons and two feature films. The Highway, the Avalon, the Kingsway, the Mayfair, the Claridge, the Tuxedo, the Oceana, the
Oriental, the Avenue U,the Kent, the Paramount, the RKO Tilyou, the Mermaid, the Surf, the Walker, the Albemarle, the Alpine, the Rugby, the Ambassador, the People’s Cinema, the Canarsie, the Marlboro, the Avon and the Globe.
19. Everybody knew all the high schools in Brooklyn.
20. Big eating and coffee hangouts: Dubrow’s on Kings Highway, also on Eastern Parkway/Utica Avenue, Famous on 86th Street, and Garfield’s
onFlatbush Avenue.
21. Ebinger’s was the great bakery … loved the chocolate butter cream
with the almonds on the side, Boston Cream pie, and the Blackout cakes!
Bierman’s was terrific also.
22. Kings Highway stores had their own ornate glitz as far as style goes.
23. There were many delicatessens in the 50’s — very few today. The best? Adelman’s on 13th Avenue and Hymie’s on Sutter Avenue. The food was from heaven!
Adlemans and Hymies Guy with Hymies menu
24. Big night clubs in Brooklyn were the Ben Maksiks’ “Town and Country” on Flatbush Avenue and “The Elegante’ ” on Ocean Parkway.

25. There were no fast food restaurants in the 50’s and a hamburger tasted like a hamburger.
26. There was Murray the K, rock and roll concerts at the Brooklyn Fox and the Brooklyn Paramount. You had to go the night before to get good seats.
Horn and Hardart
27. Quick bites at Brennan and Carr, Horn and Hardart Automat, Nedick’s,
Big Daddy’s, Chock Full o’ Nuts, Junior’s, Grabsteins or Joe’s Delicatessen. Junior’s, you’ll be glad to know, is still in the same place, and the cheesecake is still fabulous.)
28. Knishes were great at Mrs. Stahl’s in Brighton or at Shatzkin’s Knishes. Remember the knish guy on the beach with the shopping bags?
Mrs Stahl's Knishes
Mrs. Stahlʼs Knishes is Now a Subway

29. People in Brooklyn took pride in owning a Chevy in the 50’s; there was nothing better than General Motors then. The cars would run and run and run, no problems.
55 Chevy

30. You bought sour pickles right out of the barrel — for a nickel — and they were delicious. By the 60’s, they cost a whole quarter.
Pickle barrel

Anyone remember Miller’s Appetizing, on the corner of 13th Avenue and 50th Street?

31. The Brooklyn Dodgers were part of your family.
The Duke, the Scoonge, Pee Wee, Jackie, the Preacher, Campy, Junior, Clem, Big Don,  Gil. They were always in a lot of our conversations. Remember Ebbet’s Field and Happy Felton’s Knothole club? For a nickel, you got into Ebbet’s Field and saw the Dodgers play. For Brooklynites it was — and will always be — a shrine.
Ebbet's Game Ebbet

 

32. You come from Brooklyn but you don’t think you have an accent. To you Long Island is one word which sounds like “Longuyland.”

33. You played a lot of games as kids. Depending on whether you were a boy or a girl, you could play: ringaleaveo, Johnny on t he Pony, Hide and Seek, three feet off to Germany, red light-green light, chase the white horse, kick the can, Buck, Buck, how many horns are up?, war, hit the penny, pussy-in-the-corner, jump rope, double-dutch, Stories, A-My
Name Is, box ball,stick ball, box baseball, catch a fly, dodge ball, stoop ball, you’re up, running bases, iron tag, skelly, tops, punch ball, handball, slap ball, whiffle ball,stick ball, poison ball, relay races, softball, baseball, basketball, horse, 5-3-1, around the world, foul shooting, knockout, arm wrestling,
Indianwrestling. And then there were card games like canasta, casino, hearts, pinochle, war and the unhappy game of 52-card pickup.

34. You hung out on people’s stoops or in the Courtyard.
Hanging out on stoops

35. You learned how to dance at some girl’s backyard or house

36. You roller skated at Park Circle or Empire Blvd. skating rinks in skates with wooden wheels. You had roller skates at home with metal wheels for using on the sidewalks, and you needed a skate key to tighten
them around your shoes. Those metal wheels on concrete were deafening!

37. The big sneaker was Converse. Also Keds and
P-F Flyers.

38. The guys wore Chino pants with a little buckle on the back, peg pants, and the girls wore long wide dresses. Remember gray wool skirts
with pink felt poodles on them? The poodles had rhinestone eyes.
Girls at dance

39. In the 50’s rock and roll started big teen styles for the first time.

40. Everyone went to a Bar Mitzvah even if you weren’t Jewish.

41. Everyone took their date to Plum Beach for the submarine races.

42. There were 3 main nationalities in Brooklyn in the 50’s: Italians, Irish and Jewish. Then there was a sprinkling of everyone else. The Scandinavians and Greeks in Bay Ridge, the African Americans in
Bedford Stuyvesant and the Polish of Green Point.

43. The only way to get to Staten Island was by ferry from the 67th Street pier in Brooklyn. It was a great ride in the summer time for a dime.
Ferry boat and SOL

44. In Brooklyn, a fire hydrant is a “Johnny pump.”

45. Rides on a truck came to your neighborhood to give little kids a
ride for a dime. The best one was the “whip,” which spun you around a track. You got a little prize when you got off, sometimes a folding paper fan, sometimes a straw tube that you inserted two fingers into, that tightened asyou tried to pull your fingers out again.
Kids Ride

46. As a kid you hit people with water balloons from atop a building,
you shot linoleum projectiles from a carpet gun, you shot dried peas
from pea shooters, and you shot paperclips at people with a rubber band. C3?C2

47. You shopped at EJ Korvettes, Robert Hall, Woolworth’s, Mays,
McCrory’s, Packers, A&P, Bohack, A&S. Barney’s was Barney’s Boys Town
back then,and not a luxury store. You bought your shoes at National and Mile s, A S Beck. When you got married you bought your dishes at Fortunoff’s under the”el”.

48. NBC main production studio was on Avenue M.and E.16 St. The Cosby show was made there.

49. Everybody lived near a candy store and a grocery store.

50. The first mall comes to Brooklyn at Kings Plaza.

51. Bagel stores start popping up everywhere in the 60’s.

52. Went to Jahn’s Ice Cream Parlor with a big group and had the “Kitchen Sink.” If it was your birthday (you had to bring your birth certificate),you could get a sundae free.
Jahn's Ice Cream Jahn's Kitchen Sink

53. Everybody knew somebody who was a connected guy.
Connected guys

54. We used the word “swell”; that’s pass=C3?=C2=A9 today.

55. In the summer we all waited for the Good Humor, Bungalow Bar, Mister Softee or Freezer Fresh man to come into our neighborhood to buy ice cream. In the early to mid 50’s, the Good Humor man pushed a cart  instead of driving a truck. Remember the bells? A pop was 15 cents. A large cup was 15 cents, a small cup was a dime. And a sundae — remember licking the chocolate off the back of the cardboard top? — was a quarter. (Movie stars pictures on bottom of the Dixie cup lids).

Good Humor Man
As a kid growing up in the 1950s we would spend our money on bubble gum baseball cards, candy and ice cream. A pack of baseball cards (complete with a stick of bubble gum) and full-size candy bars were 5 cents each or six for a quarter. In the summer the . In those days there were lots of interesting coins still in circulation.  Dimes and quarters we still made of silver. The oldest Roosevelt dimes were not yet 15 years old. It was not uncommon to find Mercury dimes or worn out Standing Liberty quarters; and Buffalo or Indian Head nickels were common too. Most pennies were wheat-backs; they didn’t get the familiar Lincoln Memorial on the reverse until 1959. With luck it was even possible to find an occasional Indian Head penny in your change. But the most coveted find (for us kids, anyway) was the unusual 1943 steel penny.
coins

56. Many of us would sneak cigarettes and hide them when we got home.

57. When we talked about “the city” everyone knew we meant,Manhattan.

58. The Mets in the 60’s became our substitute for the Dodgers. But they never did, and never will, make up for the Dodgers leaving.

59. In the 60’s we were ready to drive and hit the night life scene. With the car came the girls.

60. We are all in a select club because we have roots in BROOKLYN.


Comments

Things I Remember… — 14 Comments

  1. Hi to all, I was reading some of your post and what good exciting memories occurred. This is Patricia Fogler. My brother Samuel Fogler is now living in Albany NY. He is a home owner and assists in programs helping others. Never married nor any children. He credits his peaceful and God fearing life to our up bringing in The Kallman Home. We rarely see one another but we do keep one another lifted in a spiritual manner. Kallman Home has been our strength and inspiration. I have three beautiful children whom I adore and love with all of my heart along with wonderful grandchildren. My husband will retire from Pastoring his Church in June after many years. I was elated when I saw a site with Richard Wise and Arthur Wise and the name Kallman Home. When I saw the picture my eyes filled with tears. Mr. Scott caused the home to close. I wish I could have stayed there until I graduated HS. I have been blessed through storms and now rainbows. I have so many memories beyond a doubt such good ones, ones that have kept me up lifted and strong from Kallmans up bringing. I have truly missed you and will always hold a special place in my heart for some of you that I remember. Your beautiful brown sister in Christ. I have raised many children of other people with no regrets. Patricia. PS, do you remember, Sandra Prader, Margie Thomas, Harold Godboat, Moreen Wearner, Gilbert Reed. I stayed in touch with Ms. Sakella she continued to mother me as long as she could. (My heart) 914 8821023

    • Hi Pat, don’t know if you remember me or not. You were good friends with my sister, Chiquita now known as Darlene. I haven’t been to the website lately but just happened to think of it today, and there was your email! I thought I would drop you a line and see if you remember me. I am on face book now and if you want to friend me that would be good. Just type in my name and ask me to friend you and I will. Hope to talk to you soon! Tina

    • Hi I remember Samuel; we were friends at Kallman home. You have brought up some memories. Good to know your hubby is or was a minister – now retired. I too followed God in ministry.

      Many of your friends names I remember; we must have been at Kallman about the same time.

      Well, that is all for now. God bless you, Tom [Tommy] Mather.

  2. Floyd Bennett field, you watched the planes take off and land. The Staten Island Ferry for a nickel. There was no place in the world like Brooklyn. It was a city within it’s self. French fries were sold in brown paper bags for five cents, ten cents and twenty five cents. The best Pizza anywhere was in Brooklyn. Italian ices the best in the world. Archie comic books.

  3. Dear Stu Cameron: I’m interested in learning more about the Children’s Home of L.I. Baptist, specifically of the 1930-1940 time. I am researching a family tie to the organization when 3 of my aunt’s were placed there (surname Colle). I have just discovered this family line and recently connected with one of their daughters. I’m helping her locate the youngest child who the family lost track of. Thanks for any help.

    • I was in the Baptist Children’s Home 2360 Ocean Ave ,Brooklyn, between 1942 & 1947. There was a Lois Cole “my spelling” I think she was there when I left,not sure. I have a group photo, taken at summer retreat at Pyle House .Hampton Bays L.I. She is younger than I.I’m 83 now.She was blond frail & had some Problems ??

  4. I remember we were able to ask for a gift we wanted for Christmas. I wanted twin dolls one year and a soft covered bible the next. I got them both. We also put on plays for our parents/guardians and had a service every Sunday night. My mother was Catholic and I was convinced she was going to Hell. I remember singing “I’m in the Lord’s Army.” We liked that song becoause we could stomp our feet when we got to “march in the cavalry.”Some kids got money to spend at Christmas-5 dollars I think. I also recall receiving pink socks though I don’t know why.

  5. Wanted to also say that Heather Cameron was my best friend back then – and Jean and Joan and Susan Grennnon who had a great singing voice and Sybil Goldmark who was older and ran for class office. We helped her make gold bookmarks – Sybil Goldmark!

    This is a remarkable site. Thanks to those who made it possible.

    And Merry Christmas!!

  6. In 1967 i was camp counsellor for the day camp at the commodore hotel in so falllsberg. of the many kids i only rehttp://www.kallmanhome.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/ConeyIslandBeachCrowd.bmpember bradley monkey and pillow kastin. are you out there?

  7. In 1967 i was camp counsellor for the day camp at the commodore hotel in so falllsberg. of the many kids i only rmember bradley monkey and pillow kastin. are you out there?

    • Hello Chuck,

      I do not recall any Kallman Home functions being held at the Commodore Hotel. You might be thinking of another NYC kids nome.

      Web Administrator

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